In Deep: The Art and Science of DFM with Gary Ferrari


Reading time ( words)

When the topic of DFM techniques came up, I knew I had to talk with Gary Ferrari of FTG Corp. Gary has been involved with designing and manufacturing PCBs for decades, and he’s the past co-founder and executive director of the IPC Designers Council. I caught up with Gary between Thanksgiving and Christmas, and we conducted the following interview.

 

Andy Shaughnessy: Give us a quick background on yourself and your role at FTG.

Gary Ferrari: I have been in this industry for more than 50 years. The major portion of this time has been spent in PCB design and manufacturing. I have spent some time in assembly, industrial robotics, and nuclear and fossil power plant controls systems design.

I serve as the Director – Technical Support for FTG Circuits. My main function has many facets. First is to work with our customer base during the design phase of their products. I help them design for manufacture, which includes fabrication, assembly, repair, reliability, and field service. This includes end-product performance, both electrically and mechanically. It sounds like a lot, and it is. To meet today’s advanced products within short design cycles, one must consider all these areas when selecting materials, components, etc.

Second is to represent them within the standards develop committees of IPC. Many current-day issues are discussed during the development meetings, which affect both our company and our industry. There are so many new, advanced technologies cropping up constantly. One must stay on top of them if one expects to survive in this industry.

I also provide IPC designer certification through EPTAC, an IPC licensed training center. These courses are quite extensive, exposing the attendees to many of the issues affecting successful designs.

Shaughnessy:  So, what can PCB designers do to make the fabrication process go smoother?

Ferrari: The most important item that a designer can do is to talk to their fabrication and assembly suppliers. Ask them about how your design practices are affecting their ability to manufacture with low yields and high reliability. Most important is to find out the areas that are the most troublesome. The designer has many ways to attack a given issue, and may be able to select a design solution that is easier to manufacture, resulting in higher reliability and lower cost. This is most important when doing a new design utilizing a technology that is new to the company. Most fabricators can draw from experiences gained through a wide variety of technologies they have worked with through a large customer base. 

To read this entire article, which appeared in the January 2017 issue of The PCB Design Magazine, click here.

Share


Suggested Items

Susy Webb: Training the New Generation of Designers

08/02/2018 | Andy Shaughnessy, Design007 Magazine
For years, I’ve been running into Susy Webb at PCB West, where one of the classes she teaches is PCB design basics. I always ask Susy about the class, especially the attendees’ backgrounds. Over the years, her class has begun drawing more and more degreed engineers, with fewer “traditional” PCB designers attending. I asked Susy to discuss the next generation of PCB designers, some of the trends she’s seeing among new PCB designers, and the need for designers to take charge of their own design training, whether their management agrees or not.

Multi-board Design with Altium’s Ben Jordan

07/25/2018 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
Not too long ago, historically speaking, most electronic products contained only one PCB. But multi-board designs have become almost ubiquitous over the past decade, and EDA software companies are working to improve and simplify the multi-board design process. Editors Andy Shaughnessy and Stephen Las Marias spoke with Ben Jordan, director of product and persona marketing for Altium, about the company’s multi-board design tools, the challenges that customers face, and the numerous trade-offs that designers must contend with while performing multi-board design.

3D Convergence of Multiboard PCB and IC Packaging Design

07/18/2018 | Bob Potock, Zuken
A new generation of 3D multiboard product-level design tools offer major improvements by managing multiboard placement in both 2D and 3D, and enabling co-design of the chip, package and board in a single environment. Multiboard design makes it possible to create and validate a design with any combination of system-on-chips (SOCs), packages, and PCBs as a complete system.



Copyright © 2018 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.