Libra Industries Sponsors Local AWT RoboBot Competition for Middle and High School Students


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Libra Industries recently participated in and sponsored the Alliance for Working Together (AWT) Annual RoboBot Competition. Rod Howell, CEO of Libra Industries, has been a board member of the AWT since early on, and the company was a silver sponsor of the competition again.

The seventh annual AWT RoboBots Competition took place at Lakeland Community College in the Athletic & Fitness Center at the college’s main campus in Kirtland, OH. Libra Industries and Focus Manufacturing helped high school robotics teams do battle with robotic creations for bragging rights, trophies and, most importantly, to celebrate all the learning they’ve done over the last six months.

The competition gives students an opportunity to participate in a unique experiential learning experience. This hands-on career exploration opportunity allows them to truly experience what it means to work in manufacturing. Students leave this experience with an increased awareness of the careers available to them and the educational opportunities linked to those careers. They work alongside engineers and machinists on the manufacturing floor. Additionally, the students develop relationships with industry partners that can lead to internship and career opportunities.

The Alliance for Working Together was started in 2002 as just a small informal group (15 or 20) to discuss topics of interest and as a way to reach out to other manufacturers in the region. The AWT has since been meeting to address issues, challenges and best practices. The AWT consortium now includes 100 manufacturing companies (and growing) all engaged to work toward the sustainability of manufacturing in our community.

Libra Industries continues to invest to provide customized manufacturing solutions to help make its customers more competitive and improve their profitability.

About Libra Industries

Libra Industries is a leading provider of integrated Electronic Manufacturing Services (EMS), serving OEMs with complex or technologically sophisticated manufacturing requirements in a broad range of industries including industrial automation, medical, military and aerospace, instrumentation and LED lighting. Five world-class manufacturing facilities allow Libra Industries to provide customers with manufacturing flexibility including complete system build, module and subassembly production, as well as simple to complex PC board assembly. With an ongoing commitment to investment in people, quality systems, and the latest manufacturing equipment and processes, Libra Industries is committed to managing their clients’ products from initial design and prototype to full production; assisting their clients in their efforts to improve time to market, reduce total systems cost, and increase quality. For more information, click here.

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