IPC Automotive Electronics Reliability Forum Highlights Future of Industry


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Fueled by strong growth in electric vehicles and autonomous cars, and a dramatic increase in electronics content in conventional automobiles and trucks, automotive electronics are crucial components of engine, ignition, and transmission management; entertainment, navigation, diagnostic tools and safety systems. IPC has gathered thought leaders and subject matter experts from leading electronics and automotive companies to discuss the future of automotive electronics design and manufacturing at “IPC Automotive Electronics Reliability Forum,” June 4-5 in Nuremberg, Germany.

Andreas Aal, semiconductor strategy and reliability expert at Volkswagen, will open up the forum on June 4 with his keynote, “Challenges of Using Advanced Package Technologies in Automotive Applications.” On June 5, Dr. Maxime Makarov, head of electro-physics at Groupe Renault, will discuss electronics reliability during his keynote, “Challenges of Using Advanced Package Technologies in Automotive Applications.”

During the two-day event, Aal and Makarov will be joined by other automotive and electronics industry technologists from, Continental Automotive, Robert Bosch GmbH, Infineon, Henkel, TTM Technologies, Atotech, MacDermid Enthone, IHS Markit and more, who will provide updates and technical content on such topics as: the automotive electronics market, surface finish and assembly material interactions affecting electronic system reliability and performance, future reliability challenges for new packages, challenges of semiconductor product qualification for extended automotive requirements, and design considerations of high reliability PCBs for high power automotive applications.

“IPC’s Automotive Electronics Reliability Forum will allow attendees to build personal relationships with the innovators who are working on tomorrow’s electronics technologies as well as gain first-hand knowledge of the pioneering projects that are putting automotive electronics breakthroughs into practice,” said Philippe Léonard, IPC Europe director. “The forum is not solely about the automotive industry,” adds Léonard — “it’s about technologies, electronics market, thermal energy in PCBs, onboard electronics reliability, and much more. As the forum covers a wide breadth of relevant and timely topics, it is perfectly suited for engineers and technologists representing Transportation OEMs, Tier 1 systems providers, and assembly, printed circuit board and materials partners.”

Speaker Laurent Coudurier, combustion team manager at Air Liquide concurs, “As reliability is a major driving force for automotive electronics, it is very beneficial to share developments coming from different industrial sectors involved in the supply chain and contributing to improve reliability of electronic assemblies for cars.”

For more information or to register for “IPC Automotive Electronics Reliability Forum,” click here.

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