Arotech’s Advanced Electronics Division Acquires UST-Aldetec


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The Arotech Corporation announced that its Advanced Electronics Division (AED) acquired UST-Aldetec, a privately held corporation with sites in Fair Lawn, NJ, Sacramento, CA, and Reno, NV. UST-Aldetec is a state-of-the-art design, engineering, manufacturing and services company specializing in complex, high reliability, mission critical electronic components. The addition will bring expertise in integrated microwave assemblies and RF amplifier equipment, among other specializations, to the Advanced Electronics Division of Arotech.

The newly formed division will have the ability to support customer programs from component level selection and design to full system manufacturing, functional test and integration. UST-Aldetec will join UEC Electronics (Hanahan, SC) to expand the capabilities of Arotech’s Advanced Electronics Division into the RF Microwave space and bring needed manufacturing capabilities to the UST-Aldetec companies.

“The addition of UST-Aldetec expands our electronics capabilities into both RF and Microelectronic product platforms. This capability will open up a much broader market segment for our growing complex electronics business and allow us to serve a growing need for these types of products within our existing defense, communications, and medical markets,” said Matt Bakker, President of the Advanced Electronics Division.

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