Tulane University Conducts Conflict Minerals Market Impact Survey


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IPC members and many other companies are continuing to be burdened by compliance with U.S. conflict minerals regulations, while Europe contemplates its own conflict minerals regulations. In a continuing effort to quantify the burdens experienced by companies, especially those in the supply chain, Tulane University is conducting a Conflict Minerals Market Survey. The survey results will also assist IPC and other industry associations in lobbying for less burdensome regulations in other parts of the world, such as those currently being considered in the European Union.

All companies impacted by conflict minerals legislation or produce, procure or consume tin, tungsten, tantalum and/or gold (3TG) are invited to participate. This survey will focus on the upstream and downstream 3TG supply chain. The survey can be found here. The deadline to complete the survey is June 15, 2015. The survey is expected to take survey respondents between 10 and 30 minutes to complete and is available in English, French and Mandarin.

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