Free PCB Design Decision Tool: “Make vs Buy” Worksheet


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White Knight PCB, a division of Quarter Century Design, introduced today a new PCB design decision tool—a PCB “Make vs Buy” worksheet. Ideal for product managers, design engineers, and buyers alike, the White Knight “Make vs Buy” PCB worksheet poses 15 questions along with varying scenarios reflecting important PCB design criteria.

Numerical scoring values are suggested for each of the 15 questions. Once the “Make vs Buy” worksheet is completed, the 15 scores are totaled. Their sum (score) is then compared to predetermined scores for 5 “Make vs Buy” recommendations. These recommendations will help managers, engineers, and buyers make important outsourcing “Make vs Buy” decisions.

To request a free PCB design “Make vs Buy” worksheet, visit www.WhiteKnightPCB.com or contact Steve Stoehr at 937-434-5127, ext. 109 or info@WhiteKnightPCB.com.

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