Engineer Steve Weir Has Passed Away


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We’re sad to report late-breaking news that independent engineering consultant Steve Weir has died. No details are available at this time.

Steve was a power and signal integrity guru with a variety of patents to his name. A fixture of DesignCon and a constant presence on the SI-List signal integrity forum, Steve wrote over a dozen papers on power integrity. 

He also had a crazy, irreverent sense of humor that you don’t find among most engineers. I first met Steve about 10 years ago at DesignCon. He introduced me to a few other EEs, with caveats such as, “John’s an SI engineer, but more importantly, the statute of limitations has run out on his unprosecuted felonies. And don’t let him near your wife. Or your son, for that matter.”

It was like that with Steve. He didn’t seem to have a pause button. The world needs more people like that.

He will be missed. 

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