Mentor Video: Impact of Power Integrity on Temperature


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One of the most common outputs from a DC Drop simulation is a current density plot.  But how much is too much current density?  The answer depends on temperature rise, and requires a PI-thermal co-simulation to properly characterize. 

HyperLynx PI does an iterative co-simulation to include the effects of current density on temperature rise, and the effect of temperature on current density and voltage drop, to quickly pinpoint problems in your PCB's power distribution network. This new video explains how designers can keep their PDS from feeling the heat.

To view this video, click here.

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