To the Windy City and Back Again


Reading time ( words)

Posted by Adam Murling on Monday, November 24, 2014


 

This is an account of my trip to Indium's Chicago facility. If you didn't get a chance to read my previous post, the link is right here.  Both flights were flawless which made me happy as this was my first time flying by myself. I was a little nervous but was relieved when the weather was nice both days. Other than having to de-ice the plane leaving Syracuse, everything was great. I learned a lot working out of Indium Corporation's Chicago facility. I learned about the day-to-day activities - along with the activities of the extraordinary people. I worked on the manufacturing floor and met some very interesting individuals. They showed me how to make flux, extrude both flux-cored and solid wire, cast ingots, and refine the wire down to specific lengths for final sale. The most interesting aspect, to me, was making the flux.  I experienced both large and small batch operations. I have always enjoyed chemistry and it was nice to look at something from that perspective. Also, I worked with a wave soldering machine for the first time. It was pretty interesting; a lot different than stencil printing, and reflowing. There are so many different variables, such as: flux deposition, wave height, conveyor speed, preheat temperature, and wave temperature. I would consider it an art to run one of these machines. Each one has its own personality and quirks that makes it unique. The way the metal flowed was amazing in its own right. Profiling a wave solder machine can be more difficult than a traditional reflow oven. If you want to read more on wave solder flux, please read Eric Bastow's, blog. This particular post is about an inappropriate method that is sometimes used in wave solder flux evaluation. A diagram of the basic mechanisms of a wave solder machine is pictured below (source).

I am very grateful for this opportunity to travel to Chicago and learn so much about our products, processes, and people. I can not wait to do it again. Also, I was able to try my first slice of the famous Chicago deep dish pizza.  I understand why they call it a pizza "pie". I'm going to say that I still think New York pizza is better. Now that I m back home, I feel safer saying that. ‘Til Next Time, - Adam

Share


Suggested Items

Investigating Analytical Tools for Testing Cleanliness with Foresite's Eric Camden

04/19/2018 | Patty Goldman, I-Connect007
At the recent West Penn SMTA Expo, Eric Camden, lead investigator at Foresite Inc., speaks with I-Connect007's Patty Goldman about fluxes and analytical tools for testing cleanliness, and how these impact the reliability of the assembled boards.

Stencil Printing Techniques for Challenging Heterogeneous Assembly Applications

04/16/2018 | Mark Whitmore and Jeff Schake, ASM Assembly Systems
A new generation of near microscopic size SMT chip capacitors has appeared in the market, known as either 0201 or 008004. This article investigates and characterizes the stencil printing process for compatibility with M0201 capacitor assembly. Effects of circuit board quality, stencil thickness, and stencil nano-coating are evaluated against solder paste volume transfer efficiency and raw-volume print distribution.

Why AOI is a Must-have for PCB Assembly

04/05/2018 | Russell Poppe, JJS Manufacturing
AOI has an invaluable role to play in speeding up the process of PCB production, in ensuring extreme precision to catch even the smallest of defects, and in minimizing the potential for time-consuming and costly reworking.



Copyright © 2018 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.