Tactical Reconnaissance Vehicle Project Eyes Hoverbike for Defense


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The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, or ARL, has been exploring the tactical reconnaissance vehicle, or TRV, concept for nearly nine months and is evaluating the hoverbike technology as a way to get Soldiers away from ground threats by giving them a 3-D capability.

The Army is interested in this disruptive technology because it has the potential to increase Soldier protection at the squad level and below.

The TRV concept could unburden Soldiers while increasing their capabilities regardless of the environmental conditions, in manned and/or unmanned operations. Besides mitigating the dangers of ground threats, capabilities for the TRV concept could include aiding in communication, reconnaissance, and protection; sensing danger or even lightening the Soldiers' load.

The feasibility study of the technology recently concluded, and indicates successful performance. During the next three to five years, ARL, a part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, or RDECOM, will partner with Malloy Aeronautics, a United Kingdom-based aeronautical engineering company, and SURVICE Engineering Company, a Maryland-based defense firm, to deliver full-sized prototypes and analysis for evaluations and assessments in military applications.

This is one of many examples of ARL taking a look at novel and cutting-edge ideas, which have the potential to bring new and disruptive capabilities to U.S. land forces decades from now.

As the TRV concept progresses through the proof of principle phase, it could transition to partner organizations within RDECOM, which mature technologies into defense capabilities. ARL would continue to support the TRV project.

Additional resources: E-mail public_affairs@arl.army.mil with TRV in the subject line to be added to the mailing list for developments regarding the Tactical Reconnaissance Vehicle project.

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